The Ecological Effects of Ocean Acidification

Date:
Venue:
The Linnean Society of London, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, W1J 0BF, United Kingdom,
United Kingdom
Organiser: events@linnean.org
02074344479 ext 211

EVENING LECTURE 18:00–19:00 Thursday 27 February 2020

Diver
© G Caramana

This presentation explores the biology of ocean acidification, the process whereby carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere is rapidly changing the chemistry of the surface ocean. By investigating areas acidified by underwater volcanoes we can predict which marine organisms will thrive and which are most vulnerable. The natural gradients of carbon dioxide are like a time machine, showing which organisms can survive and what coastal habitats might look like in the coming years. As carbon dioxide levels increase this benefits some organisms, such as jellyfish and algae, but it causes an overall loss of marine biodiversity, both in temperate and tropical systems. Key groups, like hard corals, sea urchins and coralline algae, are outcompeted and fish reproduction is impacted. These findings are being used to inform policy makers and people most affected, like those who rely on fisheries and coastal tourism.

Jason is President Elect of the British Phycological Society and is organising a conference on algae in Plymouth on the 6–9 January 2020, co-hosted by the University of Plymouth. The Marine Biological Association and Plymouth Marine Laboratory. Register for the conference using this link https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/whats-on/68th-annual-meeting-of-the-british-phycological-society.

Jason Hall-Spencer is a Professor of Marine Biology at the University of Plymouth and a Research Professor at Tsukuba University, Japan. He was awarded the British Association Charles Lyell Award for science communication, giving public lectures about the discovery of deep-sea coral reefs in the Arctic. His ongoing research at the Universities of Plymouth (UK), Tsukuba (Japan) and Xiamen (China) is focussed on how rising carbon dioxide levels are affecting marine ecosystem services worldwide.


  • This event is free and open to all.
  • Registration is essential. Seats will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • Doors will open at 17:30. Please note that the meeting room will open at 17:45, 15 minutes prior to the start of the talk.
  • Tea will be served in the Library from 17:30 and the event will be followed by a white wine reception (£3 per glass).
  • Please note that Fellows-only tickets are limited to two tickets per Fellow (one for themself and a guest).